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The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was signed into law in 1973 to protect animal and plant species at risk of extinction due to habitat changes or loss. The ESA is intended to conserve the habitats and to foster the recovery of threatened or endangered animal and plant species across the United States based on sound data and science. And though the ESA was never intended to be used by environmental organizations as a litigation tool, it has since been abused in order to halt development or destroy economic growth and job creation while diverting millions of taxpayer dollars away from species recovery.

Over the past few years, there have been numerous efforts in Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Oklahoma, and elsewhere to list species as endangered and place hundreds of thousands of acres of land off-limits to economic development. And a new, stronger wave of threats is expected.

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Latest News

Weekly Newsletter – 2/23/18

Issues Mexican gray wolves increase by one, survey finds. On Wednesday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) reported that the Mexican gray wolf population in the southwest region of the United States grew by one animal in 2017. The survey found the total wolf count to be 114, a number that reflects on-the-ground data collected throughout the winter by [...]

Weekly Newsletter – 2/16/18

Issues Zinke signs order to improve habitat and conservation of Western species. Last Friday at the Western Conservation and Hunting Expo in Salt Lake City, Department of Interior (DOI) Secretary Ryan Zinke signed Secretarial Order 3362, directing “appropriate bureaus within the [DOI] to work in close partnership” with eleven Western states “to enhance and improve the quality of big game [...]

Weekly Newsletter – 2/9/18

Issues Federal Fish and Wildlife Service declares Texas Hornshell endangered. In today’s Federal Register, the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) published a rule that outlines the service’s determination that the Texas Hornshell warrants “endangered” status under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The 57-page rulemaking states, “We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, determine endangered species status under the Endangered Species [...]